Monetize Yourself Media – Sell Your Expertise Directly

This post is part a series on specific media for monetizing yourself. Today I’m going to talk about another category of potential media: selling your expertise directly through books or information products.

Sell your expertise in products

Write a book

Yes, you can write a book. It used to be that writing a book involved a huge mess. You had to get an agent, who had to convince a publisher that you could sell 1000 copies, so as to find a book deal, then negotiate an advance, and so on. Big deal, big mess, and contingent on the approval of people you don’t know and probably don’t like.

Not any more. It’s now easy to

  • write a book (word processing! No more white-out!),
  • publish a book (you can publish an ebook for free, or get someone to publish it for you for less than $100. Paper books can be printed in lots as small as a dozen, so publishing houses are far less concerned with selling 1000 copies), and

  • market a book (it’s hard to get on the shelves of Barnes And Noble or Borders, but almost trivial to get on the “shelves” of Amazon.com).

Now all you have to do is figure out what to write a book on. What have you found yourself wishing you could find a book about? What have you had to experiment and develop mostly through trial and error, because there are no books on it? What do your family and friends call you to get help with? Don’t tell me that there isn’t anything; see the story below.

Create Information Products

A book is actually a subset of information products, but I gave it its own category because it’s by far the best-known information product.

An information product is just what it sounds like: a product that provides information. A book is one example. Other examples include (but are not limited to):

  • a DVD on how to use your new exercise equipment, or
  • a 1-page checklist of things to pack on your vacation, or
  • a spreadsheet that sorts your expenses into budget categories, or
  • a deck of flash cards, or
  • a comic book on how to play this board game, or….

Information products are great because they’re so flexible, and it’s entirely possible that your expertise doesn’t fit well into a book. Someone whose gift is in designing and assembling awesome carpentry projects would be far better off selling how-to videos. If your gift is organizing things, you may be better off selling mini e-books like “101 Things To Take on Vacation” or “Everything to Do To Get Your House Clean Enough For Your Mother-In-Law”.

But I Don’t Have Expertise

Judy Murdoch tells a story of a teacher who said she couldn’t make an information product, because she wasn’t an expert on anything. Judy challenged this statement, said she was sure the teacher knew something worth $50. Intrigued, they started discussing.

Turns out…
this teacher, having years of experience with 7-year-olds, knew how to get first graders to pick up after themselves.
Wouldn’t you pay to know that?

The lesson?
Everyone undervalues what they know. You undervalue what you know how to do, just because you know how to do it.

We’re all experts at something. You just have to find your market.

Resources For Further Reading
Information Product Development from Highly Contagious Marketing
Buy The Book Marketing: Internet Marketing for Authors